Bio

Boston Roots and Cowboy Girl Boots.  All the way from Nashville to Memphis, and beyond, Dream Girl is the evolution of Juliet Simmons Dinallo’s singing, songwriting, and journey that began with 2013’s No Regrets album on Tree-O-Records.  

Dream Girl, produced by Michael Dinallo and Ducky Carlisle, The Tremolo Twins, is an amalgam of Nashville and Memphis. Dusty in MemphisI Am Shelby Lynne, Stax/Volt, classic Nashville sides, From Elvis in Memphis along with soulful group singing. Juliet enlisted two other tremendous vocalists from Boston, Amber Casares and Anita Suhanin, to sing with her. The blend is reminiscent of the Staple Singers at times ("Until I Go") or the Trio album ("Moonshine and Sweet Tea") with Dolly, Emmylou, and Linda. Tim Carter (who is a direct link to The Carter Family) recorded the mandolin, fiddle, and banjo at his studio in Goodlettsville TN.  The majority of the songs were solely by Juliet a few exceptions. 

Born in North Carolina, Juliet grew up in Maine and came of age as a musician in Boston.  She recently moved to east Nashville, and  these experiences have influenced her songwriting, singing and performance style, giving everything she does a unique expression.

Juliet was exposed to the arts and music from birth with both her parents being English literature scholars.  Her father studied Shakespeare, hence her name, and her mother was a folk music DJ while at college.  With music and literature all around her, it is no wonder Juliet was singing songs by the Beatles as soon as she could walk and talk. Juliet studied music at the Berklee College of Music in Boston, where she landed a spot on the world-renowned Berklee Gospel Choir. 

Immersing herself in the eclectic Boston music scene served as the springboard for her first foray into writing the songs that would make up her debut record No Regrets.  Growing up as an artist in this fertile musical environment helped Juliet transcend her musical influences (Patty Griffin, the Beatles, Shawn Colvin, The Carter Family, Steve Earle, Lucinda Williams, Lyle Lovett, and Emmylou Harris), while maintaining the inspiration they provided.  Janet Goodman wrote this about No Regrets in Music City News, “Being compared by critics to Lucinda Williams and making the CMA CloseUp Magazine’s “Who New To Watch in 2013” list have got to be hard to live up to, but Juliet and the Lonesome Romeos do that with their debut album No Regrets. The final track here is her finest moment – the waltz ‘Learn To Love Again’ – where she must dip into someplace deep for such longing in her performance.  Not since Deana Carter’s ‘Strawberry Wine’ has ¾ time deserved a spot back on contemporary radio playlists.” 

Juliet on the drive and feeling behind her songwriting,  “Music is, to me, an endless sea of emotions I visit when I am writing. I dive in and soon I find what I am looking for!” 

Touring to support No Regrets brought Juliet in close contact with the culture and musical history that so informed her influences. The many trips, especially through the South, brought Juliet in close contact with sounds, ideas, visuals, and everyday life – both around her and experiences of her own - that would inform and inspire the songwriting on Dream Girl.  As Edd Hurt writes in the liner notes to Dream Girl, “Juliet Simmons Dinallo and Michael Dinallo, who collaborated on three of the songs here (Juliet wrote the rest) sound as though they’re in love with the music of the South, but they’re also in love with the possibilities of transition that soul music has always laid out so eloquently.” 

Dream Girl represents new beginnings, letting go of darker times, and beautiful journeys to new places. It also represents new love and hope!” says Juliet of her new album. 

In between No Regrets and Dream Girl, Juliet was a featured artist on Feel Like Going Home: The Songs of Charlie Rich, which was released on Memphis International Records in 2016.  Juliet sings “Whirlwind” which was Charlie Rich’s first single for Sam Phillips and Phillips International Records.  “(A) sizzling rocker by Juliet Simmons Dinallo, romping through ‘Whirlwind’ with a lively, echoed vocal uncannily reminiscent of the young Rosanne Cash complemented by a wildly romping guitar,” wrote David McGee in Deep Roots.